Learning from the best: Mike Tuchscherer

In my opinion hands down the best powerlifter of all time is Mike Tuchscherer. Now I know what you’re thinking: what about the great Ed Coan or the dominant Eric Lilliebridge Jr. or even the supreme super heavyweight Ray Williams. Mike Tuchserer is the best because he changed powerlifting. He revolutionized the sport, combining science and experience to create reactive training systems and the widely used RPE method.

Mike is such an impactful lifter as he conquered both the raw and equipped world within the IPF. Winning a gold medal at the 2009 world games, the highest honor in the sport as well as winning classic worlds as recently as 2014. His longevity and command of the sport is second to none. But, perhaps the most amazing quality that he holds is his mindset. He is able to switch between coach and athlete with ease, and he always believes he has more to learn, accepting his current position but always yearning for more.

Reactive training systems is one of the leading lights in the strength training sphere  his creation of the RPE scale and the accompanying literature has been one of the most influential methodologies used for strength training. Combining a relatively simple method of autoregulating training to ensure constant progression, as well as, the use of fatigue percentages and back off sets to add volume as efficiently as possible.

Mike places a high level of focus on technical mastery and his programming reflects that. The basic methodology calls for most sessions beginning with a single in the competition specific exercise or a slight variation at a very moderate weight. Something around a rate of perceived exertion of 8 meaning that an athlete could do 2 more repetitions at that weight. So the top single of each training session represents a weight between an opener and second attempt. The benefit of this is two-fold, primarily, the exercise is the most competition specific movement possible at a realistically achievable weight, allowing the athlete to hone technical skill and also progressively improve conservative PRs. Secondly, it prevents fatigue. Using heavy but manageable weights an athlete can improve in the movement, at the same time they prevent the relentless build up of fatigue that inevitably occurs with hard training.

Beginners in my opinion often undervalue how much powerlifting is a skill based sport. Watch the IPF world championships, while the form is highly varied between the competitors, almost without fail the athletes had flawless technique, every single attempt looked the same a clear representation of repeated consistent form and purposeful training.

In my opinion hands down the best powerlifter of all time is Mike Tuchscherer. Now I know what you’re thinking: what about the great Ed Coan or the dominant Eric Lilliebridge Jr. or even the supreme super heavyweight Ray Williams. Mike Tuchserer is the best because he changed powerlifting. He revolutionized the sport, combining science and experience to create reactive training systems and the widely used RPE method.

Mike is such an impactful lifter as he conquered both the raw and equipped world within the IPF. Winning a gold medal at the 2009 world games, the highest honor in the sport as well as winning classic worlds as recently as 2014. His longevity and command of the sport is second to none. But, perhaps the most amazing quality that he holds is his mindset. He is able to switch between coach and athlete with ease, and he always believes he has more to learn, accepting his current position but always yearning for more.

Reactive training systems is one of the leading lights in the strength training sphere  his creation of the RPE scale and the accompanying literature has been one of the most influential methodologies used for strength training. Combining a relatively simple method of autoregulating training to ensure constant progression, as well as, the use of fatigue percentages and back off sets to add volume as efficiently as possible.

Mike places a high level of focus on technical mastery and his programming reflects that. The basic methodology calls for most sessions beginning with a single in the competition specific exercise or a slight variation at a very moderate weight. Something around a rate of perceived exertion of 8 meaning that an athlete could do 2 more repetitions at that weight. So the top single of each training session represents a weight between an opener and second attempt. The benefit of this is two-fold, primarily, the exercise is the most competition specific movement possible at a realistically achievable weight, allowing the athlete to hone technical skill and also progressively improve conservative PRs. Secondly, it prevents fatigue. Using heavy but manageable weights an athlete can improve in the movement, at the same time they prevent the relentless build up of fatigue that inevitably occurs with hard training.

Beginners in my opinion often undervalue how much powerlifting is a skill based sport. Watch the IPF world championships, while the form is highly varied between the competitors, almost without fail the athletes had flawless technique, every single attempt looked the same a clear representation of repeated consistent form and purposeful training. This brings me back to the great Tuchserer, his methodology is derived from his own training protocol. His performance and consistency over a long period of time is inspirational and seems unattainable but through consistency and mindfulness, it can be achieved.

On the whole, RTS and the training methodologies established by Mike Tuchserer have been wholly dominant in the sport of powerlifting as well as conceptually fascinating. So be sure to check out his articles and learn more about the methodology and remember strength has no limit!

 

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